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www.wmfd.com - We're getting an up-close look at the devastation caused by the train derailment in Quebec. }}" />

   
 
 
Latest On Train Derailment And Explosion In Canada

Story By: Larry Stine

 

 

 
 
 
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  Original Published: 7/17/2013  We're getting an up-close look at the devastation caused by the train derailment in Quebec.   For the first time since the disaster, reporters were allowed behind the security perimeter to view the wreckage.    Annie Demelt visited the site and shows us the destruction left behind.   These are the streets Daniel Poulin grew up on, now reduced to piles of rubble, next to the mangled tankers that detroyed them.   "I know exactly what buildings were there. I know that there were people living in apartments there and seeing there's, nothing, just dust," says Poulin. "The only thing I can put there is what I still have in my memory."   For the first time, media were allowed to see what goes on in the red zone, and witness the monumental task at hand for these crews.   For police, the search for bodies through mountains of blackened debris is just as draining emotionally as it is physically.   "It's so big. It's so, the feeling is everything came so fast,"says Lt, Michel Brunet of the Quebec Provincial Police. "Nobody had time to quit and it couild happen to my own family if we were living here."   Nearbyu, firefighters are helping with the delicate and dangerous business of emptying the train's 72 tankers.   So far, only nine have been removed from the wreckage.   From here, the oil's path into Lac Megantic is easy to see, makeshift breakwaters were set up in this cove to contain it, while workers pump the oil out of the water and others take samples on shore.   After the tour, Daniel Poulin is thankful for this wall.   He says the people of Lac Megantic are not ready to see it first hand.   "Really sad is not enough. Seeing that, for me personally, is the beginning of the grieving process of the town of Lac Megantic," says Poulin. "There are people I knew who were there and looking at that, I'm quite sure they didn't suffer too much."   The experience has also left him eager to rebuild, but it's never been o clear to him just how long that process will take.
   
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