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www.wmfd.com - Wounded Syrian rebels are getting medical treatment for war injuries inside secret hospitals along the border. }}" />

   
 
 
Secret Hospitals Treat Wounded Syrian Rebels

Story By: Larry Stine

 

 

 
 
 
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  Original Published: 9/9/2013 Wounded Syrian rebels are getting medical treatment for war injuries inside secret hospitals along the border. Dr. Sanjay Gupta toured one such place in Lebanon and finds they're in need of supplies. Hard to believe, but these are the lucky ones. Most of the refugees end up scattered in camps like this with little medical care available. So, four months ago, members of the Free Syrian Army took over this mosque in the Lebanese border town of Majdel Anjar. They turned it into a very basic hospital. "So the types of injuries are gunshot wounds, head injuries, spinal cord injuries?" asked CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta. "Yeah, yeah," responded Dr. Al Nour. "You see all of them here," asked Gupta. "Yes," responded Dr. Nour. We are just walking distance to Syria, look there, just to those mountain passes. Dr. Nour is Syrian, as are all the medical staff here. They left their country to take care of wounded rebels. To keep them safe, the hospital is secret. No signs outside. They only allowed us to take pictures on the patient floors, and we agreed to limit what we would show that would identify people here. "You don't want us to show your face. How worried are you about your own safety?" asked Gupta. "A lot," responded Dr. Nour. "It is dangerous to help and save these people." There are many floors filled with patients, and inside this room, every man you see is a rebel fighter. Every one of them shot or injured in combat. A sniper shot this man in the leg. This man's arm peppered with shrapnel. They are all afraid. None wants to be identified, including this 24-year-old who says he was walking to work in Damascus, when "a rain of missiles came down." He says he felt heat on his back and soon found he could not move his legs. "He did get a cat scan which showed the fractures and he ultimately made it here to this clinic," says Gupta. "And, he did eventually get an operation, you can see the screws in the bones here from the fusion. But the problem is that the process took way too long, about three months." The surgery was successful. "Can I try to examine your legs? Is that okay? Can you try to kick up at all? No?" asked Gupta. It's not likely he will be able to walk again. In the last several weeks, Dr. Nour and his team have cared for more than 300 patients, and the good news, he tells me all survived. But, basic supplies are now running low. Dr. Al Noor says these shelves were once filled with antibiotics and pain medications. Now, just enough, he says, to last 'till the end of the month.
   
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