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www.wmfd.com - When you were a kid. maybe you were pretty handy with an Etch-A-Sketch, but probably not as good as an artist in Louisville, Kentucky. }}" />

   
 
 
An Amazing Etch-A-Sketch Artist Uses Toy As Her Medium

Story By: Larry Stine

 

 

 
 
 
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  Original Published: 12/1/2013 When you were a kid. maybe you were pretty handy with an Etch-A-Sketch. But probably not as good as an artist in Louisville, Kentucky. As Bennett Haeberle shows us, theh woman's work with a children's toy it drawing even more attention than her oil paintings. "You do have to have an eye for it, I guess." Such a masterful thing to be an artist, the precision, the patience. "It'll get done eventually." Painter Carrie Johns carries both. "There's more room for mistakes on this kind of stuff, because you can paint over and paint over," Johns says. She's modest about her skills. The people who buy her art gush over it. "Just in awe of how detailed and beautiful they were," says Candy Bennett, an art recipient. Bennett loves the graphite portraits of her children, her surprise present last Christmas from husband, Steve, who works with Carrie's dad assembling cars at Ford. "I wish I were able to do something like that," says Bennett. But the detail captured in these portraits or this painting don't hold a stencil to what Carrie considers her third medium, one that requires different strokes. "I would say that doing Etch-A-Sketch stuff is almost kinda like doing tattoo, like doing tattoo art, 'cause you draw on something and you can't take it back," says Bennett. "It's there." It's there, highly-detailed art Carrie creates by the twisting of two white knobs on an Etch-A-Sketch. "Somebody asked me once if I could do a picture of them and I did, it just has been something I was able to do," she says. From the Roman Colosseum to Rick Pitino, Peyton Siva and the national champion Louisville Cardinals, Carrie brings them to life with a toy she used to play with as a kid during long car rides. "I needed something to keep me busy, so I just started drawing on it, and everybody was impressed," she says. Her companion became a passion, a canvas or glass, aluminum dust, and a needle, art pre-framed by red plastic. "I think it's a really neat feeling to see people react to someone who can draw on an Etch-A-Sketch," she says. She likes to start with the needle in the middle, working her way out, alwasy signing in the lower corner. The process can be painstaking, time consuming. "I've done two or three a year at the most, but I'd love to do more," she says. She even sold a few, going well more than $100, and is hoping to make it a supplemental income. But how does one treat a piece of art that was created on the same medium, the same toy her son plays with? "You have to treat it as a piece of art," she says. "You can't, you know, you have to leave it straight up. You can't drop it. You have to be really careful with it, because if you break it, it's done." Be careful, unless you're okay with buying the same art twice. "Maybe you shouldn't be so careful with it, because if you drop it, maybe I can do another one for you."
   
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