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www.wmfd.com - For the first time in this country, a doctor has performed surgery wearing Google Glass, and transmitted the operation live to audiences miles away. }}" />

   
 
 
First Surgery In U.S. Transmitted With Google Glass

Story By: Larry Stine

 

 

 
 
 
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  Original Published: 6/8/2014

For the first time in this country, a doctor has performed surgery wearing Google Glass, and transmitted the operation live to audiences miles away. If you're not familiar with it, Google Glass is kind of like a frame for glasses, with a camera and computer built into it. So far, they've been worn by athletes, artists and even skydivers. Now, this is the first time they've allowed others to see surgery live, from the doctor's point of view.

The case was a routine repair of an injured knee ligament. The event was anything but routine. As he performed surgery at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Dr. Christopher Kaeding donned Google Glass, and, for the first time, transmitted a point-of-view operation to audiences miles away.

"I could start to appreciate the connectivity it gave me and the possibilities," Dr. Kaeding says. "The fact that I could sit there in real time, both audibly and even more important visually, I could communicate with somebody while I'm in the middle of a case."

As Kaeding performed surgery on the east side of Columbus, a colleague collaborated from his office across town. And, on Ohio State's main campus. a group of medical students saw this historic event from a completely different perspective.

"I think we've all shadowed surgeons before in the OR and a lot of times you're just kind of on the outside looking in," says Ryan Blackwell, an Ohio State medical student. "But this really shows you what's going on in the surgery itself."

Beyond a teaching tool, the device could also assist during an operation. A surgeon could potentially call up X-rays or MRI's of the patient, pathology reports and reference material. The doctor can even talk live to colleagues or specialists via the Internet, anywhere in world.

"It puts you right there real time," says Dr. Clay Marsh of Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center. "So, it's not only to be able to draw up any kind of information you need or to get the help you need, but it's the ability to do it immediately."

Doctors say they have visions of how this type of technology could change medicine, though it still needs to be thoroughly tested and evaluated. But with one simple procedure, doctors here have taken the first step of turning those visions into reality. Doctors say this is the latest in a long track record of testing new medical innovations at Ohio State. They admit not every new technology leads to advances in medicine, but they say, you have to be willing to use new devices and experiment with them in order to find out.

   
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