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www.wmfd.com - This year, along with reading, math and science, some of your students will get a lesson that could have a much more immediate impact. }}" />

   
 
 
Different Way For Children, Teachers To Recognize Abuse

Story By: Larry Stine

 

 

 
 
 
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  Original Published: 8/24/2014

This year, along with reading, math and science, some of your students will get a lesson that could have a much more immediate impact. Here's more on a different way to get children and their teachers to recognize abuse. Everything's cleaned up and set up and ready for children to open the books at St. Michael's School in Jeffersontown. "Other kinds of bruises to recognize are pattern bruises." Over the past few weeks though, the real eye-opening lessons, have been for your child's teacher. "It is the most important part of what we do," says Brittany Cox, a St. Michael School counselor. "Because if a kid is not safe, you know, they can't learn anything." For the first time this year, thanks to a grant from the Jefferson County-based Abuse Prevention Group, Face It, all Louisville Catholic first and sixth grade classrooms will get the lesson. "Speak Up, Be Safe." It's training for teachers on how to recognize the signs of sexual, physical and emotional abuse, and how to share that with their students. "It's not something, I think, that all schools do, but it is extremely important," says Cox. School counselor Brittany Cox says St. Michael's started the program last year, and she sees it working. "But I find students come to me when they see signs in their classmates, and I always tell them, I am the adult, that means you don't have to take on all these problems yet," Cox says. Catholic Schools Superintendent Leisa Schulz says since the early 2000's, the diocese has incorporated some sort of abuse awareness into its curriculum, but "Speak Up," includes bullying and technology threats. And if you think abuse is not something you or your child needs to know how to recognize... "You know, while we may think or it happens to someone else, and not to anyone I know, I think we need to understand the reality that yes, it can and it does happen," Schulz says. Certainly this is not the first time abuse has been on teachers' radars. All teachers are required by law to learn about the signs and report suspected abuse.

   
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